Theatre Reviews

Our theatre reviews aim to bring you the latest and best performances of plays, dance and music. Ink Pellet celebrates the country’s vibrant regional theatres – from performances of the classics and set texts, to new plays that will inspire and support you.

Once again, we have a merry band of discerning teachers who visit plays in their town (sometimes earning themselves a free programme and interval drink)to review for the magazine.

We’ll also review something you might like – just for sheer pleasure! If you would like to join our panel of reviewers, please join in or email the editor Lesley.finlay@inkwellpress.co.uk

  1. Book Review: Where the World Ends

    Book Review: Where the World Ends  

    By Geraldine McCaughrean Published by Usborne We’re in the eighteenth century and the Hebrides, tucked away in one of Britain’s remotest corners. The village community more or less subsists on seabirds and their by-products. Quill and a group of boys are – almost as a right of passage – left on a rock with three […]

  2. THEATRE REVIEW: Alleujah! – Bridge Theatre

    THEATRE REVIEW: Alleujah! – Bridge Theatre  

    Alan Bennett is probably the country’s most reliable theatre filler and his new play is funny, affectionate, sharp and (mildly) taboo-breaking as you’d expect from our 84-year-old nat… Well, I won’t say it because he hates the soubriquet, but you know what I mean. We’re in a Yorkshire general hospital destined for probable closure. Patients […]

  3. THEATRE REVIEW: A Monster Calls – Old Vic Theatre

    THEATRE REVIEW: A Monster Calls – Old Vic Theatre  

    Based on Patrick Ness’ novel, which won the 2012 Carnegie medal along with the Kate Greenaway medal for Jim Kay‘s illustrations, A Monster Calls is both theatrically stunning and emotionally hard-hitting. Children shouldn’t have to see their parents die and older people shouldn’t have to witness their adult children pre-deceasing them but, tragically, it happens. […]

  4. THEATRE REVIEW: Me and My Girl – Chichester Festival Theatre

    THEATRE REVIEW: Me and My Girl – Chichester Festival Theatre  

    Daniel Evans, artistic director of CFT and director of this show, knows how to stage a spectacle and he’s in fine form with this one which could, I suspect, be Chichester’s next West End transfer. Me and My Girl is a gloriously old fashioned, feel good musical dating from 1937. Like so many of the […]

  5. THEATRE REVIEW: The Great Gatsby – Halifax Square Chapel

     

    Ihave to admit I was slightly on edge when I arrived at the Halifax Square Chapel to see an immersive version of The Great Gatsby. “You can dress up and dance (if you want!) or simply sit at the bar and be absorbed into Gatsby’s 1920s world!” encouraged the glossy invite. Immersive theatre seems to […]

  6. THEATRE REVIEW: Our Country’s Good – Ramps on the Moon/Nottingham Playhouse Theatre Company – Nottingham Playhouse

    THEATRE REVIEW: Our Country’s Good – Ramps on the Moon/Nottingham Playhouse Theatre Company – Nottingham Playhouse  

    No wonder this is such a popular play to study with students. Timberlake Wertenbaker’s best known work celebrates  the transformational power of theatre as a group of 18th century convicts arrive in New South Wales, brutalised by both the voyage and the Marines in charge of them, and – eventually – stage a performance of […]

  7. THEATRE REVIEW:  My First Swan Lake – English National Ballet / English National Ballet School – Peacock Theatre and touring

    THEATRE REVIEW:  My First Swan Lake – English National Ballet / English National Ballet School – Peacock Theatre and touring  

    Choreographed by Antonio Castilla, this is the latest abridged ballet for young children danced by English National Ballet School students. The Spanish, Hungarian and Italian dances in Act 2  are high spots. The two girls who did the Italian dance at the performance I saw had a real lightness of touch which highlighted the humour. […]

  8. THEATRE REVIEW: Julius Caesar: The Ides of March – RSC Associate Schools Programme

    THEATRE REVIEW: Julius Caesar: The Ides of March – RSC Associate Schools Programme  

    Over 150 Kent primary and secondary school pupils came together to present this collaborative version of Julius Caesar under the auspices of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Associate Schools Programme for which the Marlowe Theatre is a partner. The play (abridged to under two hours including an interval) is divided into eleven sections with each school […]

  9. THEATRE REVIEW: Much Ado About Nothing – Shakespeare’s Globe

     

    This year’s Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank is an abridged and adapted version of Much Ado About Nothing, specially created for schools’ audiences, many of whom this will be their first experience of seeing Shakespeare live. This 90 minute adaptation by Michael Oakley is vibrant, loud and engaging. The opening scene, as Don Pedro (Tyler […]

  10. THEATRE REVIEW: Othello – Unicorn Theatre

    THEATRE REVIEW: Othello – Unicorn Theatre  

    The story telling is crystal clear in Ignace Cornelissen’s 75 minute reworking of Othello, translated by Purni Morrell. For example, we start with Othello (Okorie Chukwu) choosing Ronald Nsubuga’s Cassio as his lieutenant over Lawrence Walker’s Iago to make it clear from the outset why the scheming Iago is hell bent on bringing Othello down. […]