The arts magazine for teachers

Welcome back! So, while we’ve been away, it’s been all change at the top – with new faces in the government departments of culture and at education. On the one hand the government are pledging greater access to the arts for children, with new culture secretary Karen Bradley announcing a scheme to offer free access to the arts which “must be available to everyone, not the preserve of a privileged few” and “hoping to help nurture the cultural citizens of the future”.

On the other hand, of course, is the continuing fight to preserve arts teaching in schools, where children should have access to the arts and culture in its many forms. The systematic removal from the education system of creative and cultural opportunities for young people, from primary schools up, to focus on the ‘core’ subjects must be reversed. It’s surely not rocket science to turn STEM into STEAM.

We have interviews with Carnegie Medal winning author Sarah Crossan, music director Tom Deering and winner of the BBC Young Musician of the Year Sheku Kanneh-Mason, each recognising the teaching of arts subjects in schools as instrumental to their success.

And proving that there are still opportunities to include the arts in schools, we focus on the Shakespeare Schools Festival and the Into Film festival, both ensuring many thousands of pupils across the UK will have exposure to, and benefit from, access to various forms of the arts.

In addition, we pay visits to Glyndebourne, Stage Schools, Trinity Laban and The Roundhouse, plus a couple of contrasting portrait exhibitions to find educational opportunities across the arts and ages that may be perfect for some of your pupils.

Into Film Festival

Into Film Festival  

The INTO FILM Festival returns with 3000 free screenings and events from 9 – 25 November 2016 – Diversity, Wellbeing and Anti-Bullying are the key themes of world’s largest annual youth film festival A free trip to the cinema is once again on offer for schools all over the UK this Autumn as part of the [...]

Arts All Round

Arts All Round  

The Roundhouse is a hub of inspiration in Camden where artists and emerging talent create extraordinary work and where young people can grow creatively as individuals. Susan Elkin takes us inside. Ashley Summercorn is head of arts at Camden Centre for Learning, the borough’s provision for students whose “primary need is their social, emotional or [...]

Dance Science

Dance Science  

Susan Elkin pays a visit to Trinity Laban Conservatoire to discover song and dance training is anything but routine I’m sitting in a light, sparklingly bright modern building in Deptford chatting to Anthony Bowne, principal of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Dance and Drama. Formed in 2005 from a merger of the much older Trinity College [...]

EXHIBITION: Portrait Prowess

EXHIBITION: Portrait Prowess  

Graham Hooper left the sanctuary of his garden this summer to visit two contrasting exhibitions of portraiture… At last, the Summer has arrived, and a chance to finally sit down for a while without interruption. I find my favourite chair, position it with care to make the most of the light, and stare into the [...]

Book Review: The Shakespeare Treasury by Catherine Alexander

Book Review: The Shakespeare Treasury by Catherine Alexander  

Published by Andre Deutsch Books The Shakespeare Treasury is a fascinating collection of facts on Britain’s greatest playwright and insights into the enduring popularity of his work. Delving into the inspirations behind his masterworks and the influences of generations of performers, it reveals the incredible variety of ways Shakespeare’s plays have been adapted for stage [...]

Theatre Review: Henry V – Open Air Theatre, Regents Park. Director: Robert Hastie

Theatre Review: Henry V – Open Air Theatre, Regents Park. Director: Robert Hastie  

The profession has bewailed the dearth of good female roles in Shakespeare for centuries. So what do you do about it? Simply forget gender and cast women in men’s roles. Enter Michelle Terry as a very powerful Henry once you see past her diminutive stature. At the beginning, during the Archbishop’s Sir Humphrey-style attempts to [...]

Theatre Review: Jesus Christ Superstar – Open Air Theatre, Regent’s Park

Theatre Review: Jesus Christ Superstar – Open Air Theatre, Regent’s Park  

It isn’t often I see a show that really does deserve a standing ovation but Timothy Sheader’s immaculately directed, imaginative, sensitive new version of Jesus Christ Superstar is definitely on the list. A lone guitar begins to twang with louche sexiness at the opening of the overture – framed and lit on the top of [...]

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF… Sheku Kanneh-Mason

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF… Sheku Kanneh-Mason  

Cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason,17, became the BBC Young Musician of the Year in May when he wowed the judges with his account of the Shostakovich cello concerto number 1. Susan Elkin talks to him. What made you take up the cello? I was six. I was already learning piano and violin. The piano was fine but I [...]

Cosmopolitan Writer

Cosmopolitan Writer  

SUSAN ELKIN is enchanted by the multi-faceted and prolific writer Adèle Geras, still writing – at her own pace – at the age of 72. Most interviewees elect to meet journalists on neutral territory such as a coffee shop, hotel or reserved space at a theatre or publisher’s. It is typical of the warmth and [...]

Seventy and getting stronger

Seventy and getting stronger  

SUSAN ELKIN pays a visit to the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School as part of its anniversary season to discover a thriving septuagenarian. It’s anniversary time in Bristol. 250 years ago, in 1776, the city’s Old Vic Theatre opened, probably now Britain’s oldest surviving theatre still in business. It has a long and illustrious history [...]